Identityblog Information Card registration working again

A while ago I added “just one more feature” and, not having a test department, broke the process for registering a new information card here at Identityblog.  Predictably, I didn't see the problem because I've had my cards for, er, a while…  Anyway, I got a whole pack of emails telling me about it – and I appreciate that – but didn't have the time to track it down.  Thanks to all.

The problem was this:

People submitting a new card you would be sent an email asking them to click on a link to verify their email address.  When they did so, rather than having their membership approved, they would receive a message that not a few readers qualified as “meaningless”.  Others had saltier descriptions.

Anyway, I apologize – the problem was not with the Pamela Project's PHP code, but with a tweak I added when I changed the code to accept some experimental versions of claims selectors.  I still don't have a test department, but as far as I can tell everything now works.  Hint:  login before leaving your comment.

I currently accept managed cards from federatedidentity.net without the need to validate.  It's a slick experience.  I'd be happy to accept other providers too – just send me the distinguished name used in your signing certificate.

 

Issuing Information Cards with ADFS 2.0

When  Microsoft released Active Directory Federation Services V2 recently, we indicated we were holding off on shipping CardSpace 2.0 while figuring out how to best integrate Minimal Disclosure Technology (U-Prove) and create maximum synergy with the OpenID and OAuth initiatives.  Some feared the change in plan meant Microsoft was backing away from the idea of Information Cards and a visual identity selector.  Nothing could be further from the truth – the growth in adoption of federation and the shift toward cloud computing both make Information Card technology more important than ever.

This new announcement from Technet identity blog will therefore come as good news:

Today, Microsoft is announcing the availability of the Information Card Issuance Community Technology Preview (CTP) to enable the following scenarios with Active Directory Federation Services 2.0 RTM:

  • Administrators can install an Information Card Issuance component on AD FS 2.0 RTM servers and configure Information Card Issuance policy and parameters.
  • End users with IMI 1.0- or IMI 1.1 (DRAFT)-compliant identity selectors can obtain Information Cards backed by username/password, X.509 digital certificate, or Kerberos.
  • Continued support for Windows CardSpace 1.0 in Windows 7, Windows Vista and Windows XP SP 3 running .NET 3.5 SP1.

We have also added two new mechanisms for interaction and feedback on this topic, an Information Card Issuance Forum and a monitored e-mail alias ici-ctp@microsoft.com

 

Project Geneva – Part 5

[This is the fifth - and thankfully the final - installment of a presentation I gave to Microsoft developers at the Professional Developers Conference (PDC 2008) in Los Angeles. It starts here.]

I've made a number of announcements today that I think will have broad industry-wide support not only because they are cool, but because they indelibly mark Microsoft's practical and profound committment to an interoperable identity metasystem that reaches across devices, platforms, vendors, applications, and administrative boundaries. 

I'm very happy, in this context, to announce that from now on, all Live ID's will also work as OpenIDs.   

That means the users of 400 million Live ID accounts will be able to log in to a large number of sites across the internet without a further proliferation of passwords – an important step forward for binging reduced password fatigue to the long tail of small sites engaged in social networking, blogging and consumer services.

As the beta progresses, CardSpace will be integrated into the same offering (there is already a separate CardSpace beta for Live ID).

Again, we are stressing choice of protocol and framework.

Beyond this support for a super lightweight open standard, we have a framework specifically tailored for those who want a very lightweight way to integrate tightly with a wider range of Live capabilities.

The Live Framework gives you access to an efficient, lightweight protocol that we use to optimize exchanges within the Live cloud.

It too integrates with our Gateway. Developers can download sample code (available in 7 languages), insert it directly into their application, and get access to all the identities that use the gateway including Live IDs and federated business users connecting via Geneva, the Microsoft Services Connector, and third party Apps.

 

Flexible and Granular Trust Policy

 Decisions about access control and personalization need to be made by the people responsible for resources and information – including personal information. That includes deciding who to trust – and for what.

At Microsoft, our Live Services all use and trust the Microsoft Federation Gateway, and this is helpful in terms of establishing common management, quality control, and a security bar that all services must meet.

But the claims-based model also fully supports the flexible and granular trust policies needed in very specialized contexts. We already see some examples of this within our own backbone.

For example, we’ve been careful to make sure you can use Azure to build a cloud application – and yet get claims directly from a third party STS using a different third party’s identity framework, or directly from OpenID providers. Developers who take this approach never come into contact with our backbone.

Our Azure Access Control Service provides another interesting example. It is, in fact, a security component that can be used to provide claims about authorization decisions. Someone who wants to use the service might want their application, or its STS, to consume ACS directly, and not get involved with the rest of our backbone. We understand that. Trust starts with the application and we respect that.

Still another interesting case is HealthVault. HealthVault decided from day one to accept OpenIDs from a set of OpenID providers who operate the kind of robust claims provider needed by a service handling sensitive information. Their requirement has given us concrete experience, and let us learn about what it means in practice to accept claims via OpenID. We think of it as pilot, really, from which we can decide how to evolve the rest of our backbone.

So in general we see our Identity Backbone and our federation gateway as a great simplifying and synergizing factor for our Cloud services. But we always put the needs of trustworthy computing first and foremost, and are able to be flexible because we have a single identity model that is immune to deployment details.


Identity Software + Services

To transition to the services world, the identity platform must consist of both software components and services components.

We believe Microsoft is well positioned to help developers in this critical area.

Above all, to benefit from the claims-based model, none of these components is mandatory. You select what is appropriate.

We think the needs of the application drive everything. The application specifies the claims required, and the identity metasystem needs to be flexible enough to supply them.

Roadmap

Our roadmap looks like this:

Identity @ PDC

You can learn more about every component I mentioned today by drilling into the 7 other presentations presented at PDC (watch the videos…):

Software
(BB42) Identity:  “Geneva” Server and Framework Overview
(BB43) Identity: “Geneva” Deep Dive
(BB44) Identity: Windows CardSpace “Geneva” Under the Hood
Services
(BB22) Identity: Live Identity Services Drilldown
(BB29) Identity: Connecting Active Directory to Microsoft Services
(BB28) .NET Services: Access Control Service Drilldown
(BB55) .NET Services: Access Control In the Cloud Services
 

Conclusion

I once went to a hypnotist to help me give up smoking. Unfortunately, his cure wasn’t very immediate. I was able to stop – but it was a decade after my session.

Regardless, he had one trick I quite liked. I’m going to try it out on you to see if I can help focus your take-aways from this session. Here goes:

I’m going to stop speaking, and you are going to forget about all the permutations and combinations of technology I took you through today. You’ll remember how to use the claims based model. You’ll remember that we’ve announced a bunch of very cool components and services. And above all, you will remember just how easy it now is to write applications that benefit from identity, through a single model that handles every identity use case, is based on standards, and puts users in control.

 

Project Geneva – Part 2

[This is the second installment of a presentation I gave to Microsoft developers at the Professional Developers Conference (PDC 2008) in Los Angeles. It starts here.]

I don’t want to overwhelm you with a shopping list of all the scenarios in which the Claims-based architecture solves problems that used to be insurmountable.

But I’ll start from the enterprise point of view, and look at how this system helps with the big new trend of federation between partners. Then we’ll look at cloud computing, and see that the same architecture dramatically simplifies developing applications that can take advantage of it.  Finally, we’ll see how the approach applies to consumer-oriented web applications.  

Enterprise Federation

The rigid Enterprise perimeter is dissolving as a result of the need for digital relationships between an enterprise and its suppliers and customers, as well as the outsourcing of functions and services, the use of temporary workers, and having employees who sometimes work from home.  The firewall is still a useful element in a concentric set of defences, but must at the same time now be permeable. 

Most of us are even learning to collaborate on a per-project basis with partners who in other contexts might be our competitors.  So the relationships between business entities must be defined with more and more granularity.

In looking at this, I’m going to start with a very simple scenario – a story of two companies, where one has built an app in-house or has installed an ISV app for their own employees, and now wants to extend access to employees from a partner.

In the past, even this simple requirement has been really hard and expensive to fulfill. How can Microsoft help you solve this problem using the claims model?

Code name Geneva

Well, I'm happy to announce today, the first beta of “Geneva” software for building the claims-aware applications I’ve been talking about. It has three parts:

  1. The “Geneva” Framework: A framework you use in your .Net application for handling claims. This was formerly called “Zermatt”.
  2. “Geneva” Server: A claims provider and transformer (STS) integrated with Active Directory.  It comes with Windows, and makes managing trusts and policies easy.  Importantly, it supports Information Cards, making it easier for people to understand what identities they are using where, and to avoid phishing of their enterprise credentials. You may in the past heard this server being referred to as AD FS “2”.
  3. Windows CardSpace “Geneva”:  The second generation Information Card client for federation that is dramatically faster and smaller than the first version of CardSpace, and incorporates the feedback and ideas that have emerged from our customers and collaborators.

In the use case we’ve been considering, our solution works this way:  each enterprise puts up a single Geneva Server – leveraging the power of their Active Directory.

Then the administrators of the application alter the .NET configuration to point to their enterprise’s Geneva server (with the config change I demonstrated here ). At this point, your customer's application has become part of what we call an Enterprise identity backbone, and can accept claims.

So the software framework and components provide a single identity model that users configure in any way they want.  If you have written to this model, your app now works for both “employees” and “partner users” without a code change. All that is required is to set up the Geneve STS’s .

The fatal flaw

Anyone who has been around the block a few times knows there is one fatal flaw in the solution I’ve just described.

Your customer may have partners who don’t use Active Directory or don’t use Geneva or have settled on a non-Microsoft product.

No problem.  All aspects of Project Geneva are based on standards accepted across the industry – WS-Trust and WS-Federation.

I’m also very happy to announce that Geneva supports the SAML 2.0 protocol. Basically, no system that supports federation should be out of reach.

All this means your partners aren’t forced to use “Geneva” if they want to get access to your applications. They can use any third party STS, and that is part of the great power of the solution.

Does Microsoft practice what it preaches?

Microsoft is an enterprise too.  So if this architecture is supposed to be good for our enterprise customers, what about for Microsoft itself?  Are we following our own advice?

I’m here today to tell you Microsoft has fully stepped up to the plate around federation. And it is already providing a lot of benefits and solving problems.

You've heard a lot at the PDC about Azure. Microsoft offers cloud applications like hosted SharePoint and Exchange, and cloud developer services like the .Net Services and SQL Data Services, as well as a whole range of applications.  We want other enterprises to be able to access these services and sites, much like other enterprises want their own customers and partners to access the systems pertaining to their businesses.

So we make our offerings available to customers via the Microsoft Federation Gateway (MFG), which anchors our “services identity backbone”, and is based on the same industry standards and architecture delievered through the Geneva Project's server. It is all part of one wave, the Geneva wave of Identity Software + Services.

The result is pretty stunning, in terms of simplifying our own lives and allowing us to move forward very quickly – as it will be for enterprises that follow the same route. Through a single trust relationship to our gateway, our customers can get access to our full range of services.

Again, we’re not telling our customers what federation software to use. They can federate with the MFG using “Geneva” or other third party servers that support standard protocols.  And they can use the same protocols to federate with other gateways run by other organizations.

What about Live ID?

It is important to understand that the Microsoft Federation Gateway is different from Windows Live ID.  Yet Live ID feeds into the Gateway just as all our partners do.  I'll describe this, and the cool implications for application develoeprs of this approach, in the next installment.

The Identity Metasystem and its Identity Selectors

Paul Madsen at ConnectID makes a good point in his “Could someone hand me that hammer please?

I have a dead horse here that needs some beating.

Does  ‘identity metasystem’ not imply “a pluralism of operators and technologies”? Isn't this even almost a law?

If so, should a TC focused on a single (albeit important) identity technology claim within its name the ‘meta’ scope?

The OASIS Identity Metasystem Interoperability (IMI) Technical Committee will work to increase the quality and number of interoperable implementations of Information Cards

The IMI TC's mandate respects the ‘pluralism of operators’ required by the metasystem definition, but not the other piece.

NB: Any comment that includes any combination of  ‘forgot SAML token’ will be summarily rejected.

 

Metasystem and Identity Selector

Paul is completely right that the Identity Metasystem is a unifying model intended to bring together many contributing technologies – including Kerberos, PKI, browser-only federation protocols like SAML, WS-Security, WS-Trust and lightweight protocols like OpenID.  And in fact, reaching across this diversity is the most important thing about it.  Breadth is what allows us, as an industry, to create “one identity model” in terms of application development, deployment and most important, user experience.

To make this vision a reality, we need a component of the metasystem that has been missing: a common ”Identity Selector”  (early examples being CardSpace and DigitalMe). 

Clearly such an important component needs to evolve in the context of an international standards body, so the announcement of the new OASIS Technical Committee dedicated to Information Cards and their interoperability is an important milestone:

Boston, MA, USA; 23 September 2008 — OASIS, the international open standards consortium, has formed a new group to enable the use of Information Cards to universally manage personal digital identities. The OASIS Identity Metasystem Interoperability (IMI) Technical Committee will work to increase the quality and number of interoperable implementations of Information Cards. A rapidly-developing, Web 2.0-friendly method for shared light authentication, Information Cards let people authenticate themselves on multiple web sites without maintaining passwords for each site.

But back to the name 

While I think Information Cards are beneficial to the whole metasystem, they are not themselves the metasytem, and don't encompass all aspects of its interoperability. 

For this reason, I don't personally think the OASIS committee's name is currently quite right.

I've never personally participated in OASIS or any other standards body (I have great respect for those who do.)  So I have no idea whether it is possible to tweak a name once a committee is formed.  If it didn't turn into a major time-waster, I think doing so would show everyone's respect for all the other contributions being made to the metasystem.  I would prefer a name that is more technically specific, like the OASIS Identity Selector Interoperability Technical Committee (ISI).

The people who put in the effort to set up the committee and come up with a name will rightly say, “I wish you had given us that feedback earlier” – and I accept that criticism.  Maybe I have missed my opportunity to provide feedback.  Basically, I was sufficiently excited about the emergence of the committee, and convinced that the Identity Selector did contribute to Metasystem Interoperability, that the potential issues with the name didn't jump out at me. 

And now to Occam

And now for something completely different.  In a recent post Paul also reveals the origins of the third law of identity, and makes a great connection:

“William of Occam was a 14th century English philosopher, best know for his ‘principle of parsimony‘ in comparing different explanations for some phenomena.

entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem

“When translated and applied to identity, it's clear that Kim's Law 3 was preempted by some 700 years

entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity

New York Times on OpenID and Information Cards

Randall Stross has a piece in the NYT that hits the jackpot in explaining to non-technical readers what's wrong with passwords and how Information Cards help:    

“I once felt ashamed about failing to follow best practices for password selection — but no more. Computer security experts say that choosing hard-to-guess passwords ultimately brings little security protection. Passwords won’t keep us safe from identity theft, no matter how clever we are in choosing them.

“That would be the case even if we had done a better job of listening to instructions. Surveys show that we’ve remained stubbornly fond of perennial favorites like “password,” “123456” and “LetMeIn.” The underlying problem, however, isn’t their simplicity. It’s the log-on procedure itself, in which we land on a Web page, which may or may not be what it says it is, and type in a string of characters to authenticate our identity (or have our password manager insert the expected string on our behalf).

“This procedure — which now seems perfectly natural because we’ve been trained to repeat it so much — is a bad idea, one that no security expert whom I reached would defend.”

“The solution urged by the experts is to abandon passwords — and to move to a fundamentally different model, one in which humans play little or no part in logging on. Instead, machines have a cryptographically encoded conversation to establish both parties’ authenticity, using digital keys that we, as users, have no need to see.

“In short, we need a log-on system that relies on cryptography, not mnemonics.

“As users, we would replace passwords with so-called information cards, icons on our screen that we select with a click to log on to a Web site. The click starts a handshake between machines that relies on hard-to-crack cryptographic code…”

Randall's piece also drills into OpenID.  Summarizing, he sees it as a password-based system, and therefore a diversion from what's really important:

“OpenID offers, at best, a little convenience, and ignores the security vulnerability inherent in the process of typing a password into someone else’s Web site. Nevertheless, every few months another brand-name company announces that it has become the newest OpenID signatory. Representatives of Google, I.B.M., Microsoft and Yahoo are on OpenID’s guiding board of corporations. Last month, when MySpace announced that it would support the standard, the nonprofit foundation OpenID.net boasted that the number of “OpenID enabled users” had passed 500 million and that “it’s clear the momentum is only just starting to pick up.”

“Support for OpenID is conspicuously limited, however. Each of the big powers supposedly backing OpenID is glad to create an OpenID identity for visitors, which can be used at its site, but it isn’t willing to rely upon the OpenID credentials issued by others. You can’t use Microsoft-issued OpenID at Yahoo, nor Yahoo’s at Microsoft.

“Why not? Because the companies see the many ways that the password-based log-on process, handled elsewhere, could be compromised. They do not want to take on the liability for mischief originating at someone else’s site.

Randall is right that when people use passwords to authenticate to their OpenID provider, the system is vulnerable to many phishing attacks.  But there's an important point to be made:  these problems are caused by their use of passwords, not by their use of OpenID. 

When people authenticate to OpenID in a reliable way – for example, by using Information Cards -  the phishing attacks are no longer possible, as I explain in this video.  At that point, it becomes a safe and convenient way to use a public personna.

The question of whether and when large sites will accept the OpenIDs issued by other large sites is a more complicated one.  I discussed a number of the issues here.   The problem is that for many applications, there needs to be a layer of governance on top of the identity basic technology.  What happens when something goes wrong?  Are there reliability and quality of service guarantees?  If informaiton is leaked, who is responsible?  How is fiscal liability established?  And by the way, we need to figure this out in order to use any federation technology, whether OpenID, SAML or WS-Trust.

So far, these questions are being answered on an ad hoc basis, since there are no established frameworks.  I think you can divide what's happening into two approaches, both of which make a lot of sense: 

First, there are relying parties that limit the use of OpenID to low-value resources.  A great example is the French telecom company Orange.  It will accept ID's from any OpenID provider – but just for free services.  The approach is simply to limit use of the credentials to so-called low-value resources.  Blogger and others use this approach as well.

Second, the is the tack of using the protocol for higher-value purposes, but limiting the providers accepted to those with whom a governance agreement can be put in place.  Microsoft's Health Vault, for example, currently accepts OpenIDs from two providers, and plans to extend this as it understands the governance issues better.  I look at it as a very early example of a governance-oriented approach.

I strongly believe OpenID moves identity forward.  The issues of password attacks don't go away – in fact the vulnerabilites are potentially worse to the extent that a single password becomes the gate to more resources.  But technologies like Information Cards will solve these problems.  There is a tremendous synergy here, and that is the heart of the matter.  Randall writes:

“We won’t make much progress on information cards in the near future, however, because of wasted energy and attention devoted to a large distraction, the OpenID initiative. “

But I think this energy and attention will take us in the right direction as it shines the spotlight on the benefits and issues of identity, wagging identity's ”long tail”. 

 

Key Piece of The Identity Puzzle

John Fontana, who writes expert pieces about identity for Network World, just posted this piece, called “Microsoft Sets Key Piece of Identity Puzzle“.   

Microsoft Wednesday released a beta of its most important tool to date for helping developers build applications that can plug into the company's Identity Metasystem and provide what amounts to a re-usable identity service for securing network resources.

Code-named Zermatt, the tools are a new extension to the .Net Framework 3.5 that helps developers more easily build applications that incorporate a claims-based identity model for authentication/authorization. Claims are a set of statements that identify a user and provide specific information such as title or purchasing authority…

John goes on to quote Stuart Kwan:

“The model is that when a user arrives at the applications, they bring claims that they fetched from an STS ahead of time,” says Stuart Kwan, director of program management for identity and access for Microsoft. “Zermatt is one part of building apps that can more easily plug into your environment. You use Zermatt so [applications] can use the STS in your environment.”

In fact, a network would have multiple STS nodes. Those nodes will eventually include Active Directory, which will have an STS built into the directory's Federation Services in the next version slated to ship sometime after 2008.

Microsoft will use the new Federation Services capabilities, Zermatt and STS technology to build toward its ultimate goal of an “identity bus.” The nirvana of the idea is that off-the-shelf applications could plug into the bus in order to authenticate users and provide access control.

In my view, as enterpise applications and desktop suites start to integrate with the identity metasystem,  it will become obvious that businesses can build “business logic” into STS's and suddenly get a huge payoff by controlling access, identity and personalization in all their off-the shelf and enterprise-specific applications.  This is going to be huge for developers, who will be able both to simplify and deliver value.

But back to John and Stuart:

Kwan says Zermatt also can be used to build an STS that would run on top of custom built stores of user data.  He says Zermatt could be used to build applications that accept information from CardSpace, the user-centric identity system in Vista and XP.

The final release of Zermatt is expected by year-end.

It is the first time Microsoft has so directly written its sizeable development army into its Identity Metasystem, plan, which was outlined first in 2005 and defines a distributed identity architecture for multi-vendor platforms.

Read the full story here.

Information Card Foundation Formed

It's a great day for Information Cards, Internet security and privacy. I can't put it better than this:

June 24, 2008 – Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom, United States – An array of prominent names in the high-technology community today announced the formation of a non-profit foundation, The Information Card Foundation, to advance a simpler, more secure and more open digital identity on the Internet, increasing user control over their personal information while enabling mutually beneficial digital relationships between people and businesses.

Led by Equifax, Google, Microsoft, Novell, Oracle, and PayPal, plus nine leaders in the technology community, the group established the Information Card Foundation (ICF) to promote the rapid build-out and adoption of Internet-enabled digital identities using Information Cards.

Information Cards take a familiar off-line consumer behavior – using a card to prove identity and provide information – and bring it to the online world. Information Cards are a visual representation of a personal digital identity which can be shared with online entities. Consumers are able to manage the information in their cards, have multiple cards with different levels of detail, and easily select the card they want to use for any given interaction.

“Rather than logging into web sites with usernames and passwords, Information Cards let people ‘click-in’ using a secure digital identity that carries only the specific information needed to enable a transaction,” said Charles Andres, executive director for the Information Card Foundation. “Additionally, businesses will enjoy lower fraud rates, higher affinity with customers, lower risk, and more timely information about their customers and business partners.”

The founding members of the Information Card Foundation represent a wide range of technology, data, and consumer companies. Equifax, Google, Microsoft, Novell, Oracle, and PayPal, are founding members of the Information Card Foundation Board of Directors. Individuals also serving on the board include ICF Chairman Paul Trevithick of Parity, Patrick Harding of Ping Identity, Mary Ruddy of Meristic, Ben Laurie, Andrew Hodgkinson of Novell, Drummond Reed, Pamela Dingle of the Pamela Project, Axel Nennker, and Kim Cameron of Microsoft.

“The creation of the ICF is a welcome development,” said Jamie Lewis, CEO and research chair of Burton Group. “As a third party, the ICF can drive the development of Information Card specifications that are independent of vendor implementations. It can also drive vendor-independent branding that advertises compliance with the specifications, and the behind-the-scenes work that real interoperability requires.”

The Information Card Foundation will support and guide industry efforts to enable the development of an open, trusted and interoperable identity layer for the Internet that maximizes control over personal information by individuals. To do so, the Information Card infrastructure will use existing and emerging data exchange and security protocols, standards and software components.

Businesses and organizations that supply or consume personal information will benefit from joining the Information Card Foundation to improve their trusted relationships with their users. This includes financial institutions, retailers, educational and government institutions, healthcare providers, retail providers, travel, entertainment, and social networks.

The Information Card Foundation will hold interoperability events to improve consistency on the web for people using and managing their Information Cards. The ICF will also promote consistent industry branding that represents interoperability of Information Cards and related components, and will promote identity policies that protect user information. This branding and policy development is designed to give all Internet users confidence that they can exert greater control over personal information released to specific trusted providers through the use of Information Cards.

“Liberty Alliance salutes the open industry oversight of Information Card interoperability that the formation of ICF signifies,” said Brett McDowell, executive director, Liberty Alliance. “Our shared goal is to deliver a ubiquitous, interoperable, privacy-respecting federated identity layer as a means to seamless, secure online transactions over network infrastructure. We look forward to exploring with ICF the expansion of the Liberty Alliance Interoperable(tm) testing program to include Information Card interoperability as well as utilization of the Identity Assurance Framework across Information Card deployments.”

As part of its affiliations with other organizations, The Information Card Foundation has applied to be a working group of Identity Commons, a community-driven organization promoting the creation of an open identity layer for the Internet while encouraging the development of healthy, interoperable communities.

Additional founding members are Arcot Systems,Aristotle, A.T.E. Software, BackgroundChecks.com, CORISECIO, FuGen Solutions, the Fraunhofer Institute, Fun Communications, the Liberty Alliance, Gemalto, IDology, IPcommerce, ooTao, Parity, Ping Identity, Privo, Wave Systems, and WSO2

Further information about the Information Card Foundation can be found at www.informationcard.net.

I enjoy having been invited to join the foundation board as one of the representatives of the identity community, rather than as a corporate representative (Mike Jones will play that role for Microsoft). Beyond the important forces involved, this is a terrific group of people with deep experience, and I look forward to what we can achieve together.

One thing for sure: the Identity Big Bang is closer than ever.  Given the deep synergy between OpenID and Information Cards, we have great opportunities all across the identity spectrum.

Flickr, Windows Live ID and Phishing

We talk a lot in the identity milieu about opening up the “walled Gardens” that keep our digital experiences partitioned between Internet portals.  Speaking as a person who dabbles in many services, it would be really great if I could reuse information rather than entering it over and over again.  I think as time goes on we will get more and more fed up with the friction that engulfs our information.   Over time enough people will feel this way that no portal will be able to avoid ”data portability” and still attract usage.

Even so, many have argued that today’s business models don’t allow more user-centric services to evolve.  That’s why it has been fascinating to read about the new Flickr Friend Finder.  I think it is tremendously significant to see organizations of the stature of Flickr, Yahoo, Google and Microsoft working closely together so people can easily associate their pictures on one site with their friends and colleagues from others.

Once people decide to share information between their services, we run smack dab into the “how” of it all.  In the past, some sites actually asked you to give them your username and password, so they could essentially become you.  Clearly this was terrible from a security and identity point of view.  The fact is, sharing requires new technology approaches.

Windows Live has moved forward in this area by developing a new “Contacts API“.  Angus Logan gave us a great overview on his blog recently, taking us through the whole experience.  I recommend you look at it – the design handles a lot of fascinating issues that we’ll be encountering more and more.  I’ll just pick up on the first couple of steps:

Go to the Friend finder

image

Select Windows Live Hotmail (you can also select Yahoo! Mail and GMail) – I’d imagine soon there will be Facebook / LinkedIn / insert social network here.

 image

If you aren’t already authenticated, use your Windows Live ID to sign in (IMPORTANT: Notice how you are not sharing your Windows Live ID secret credential pair with Flickr – this is a good thing!)

image

If you have followed my work on the problems with protocols that redirect users across web contexts, you will see there is a potential problem here.  

If Flickr plays by the rules, it will not learn your username and password, and cannot “become you”.  It really is a step forward.

But if a user gets used to this behavior, an unreputable site can pretend to send her to Windows Live by putting up a fake page.  The fake can look real enough that the user gives away her credentials.

A user called davidacoder called this out on Angus’ blog:

I think this whole approach will lead to many, many, many hacked Windows Live ID accounts. If you guys seriously believe that average users will be able to follow the rule “only type in your credentials on login.live.com” your are just naive. AND your own uber-security guy Kim Cameron is telling that very story to the world for years already. I wouldn’t mind so much if a Live ID was a low-value asset, but you bring people to associate some of their most valuable assets with it (email, calendar, contacts). I find the whole approach irresponsible. I just hope that at some point, if someone looses his credentials this way, he will sue you and present Kim Cameron’s blog as evidence that you were perfectly aware in what danger you bring your users. And to make a long story short, I think the Live ID team should fix the phising problem first (i.e. implement managed infocards), before they come up with new delegation stuff etc that will just lead to more attack surface. Very bad planning.

I admire David’s passion, although I’d prefer not to be used in any law suits if that is OK with everyone.  Let’s face it.  There are two very important things to be done here. 

One is to open up the portals so people can control their information and use it as they see fit  I totally endorse Angus’ work in this regard, and the forward-looking attitude of the Windows Live team.  I urge everyone to give them the credit they deserve so they’ll continue to move in this positive direction.

The other is to deal with the phishing problems of the web. 

And let me be clear.  Information sharing is NOT the only factor heightening the need for stronger Internet identity.  It is one of a dozen factors.  Perhaps the most dangerous of these is the impending collision between the security infrastructure of the Internet and that of the enterprise.  But no one can prevent this collision – or turn back the forces of openness.  All we can do is make sure we apply every effort to get stronger identity into place.

On that front, today Neelamadhaba Mahapatro (Neel), who runs Windows Live ID, put up a post where he responds to David’s comment:

Earlier this week a comment was left on Angus Logan’s blog, it got me thinking, and I want to share what we are doing to create phishing resistant systems.

  • We are absolutely aware of the dangers of phishing on the Internet.
  • We understand the probability of attack goes up when the value of the asset that is being protected is higher than the strength of authentication protecting that asset – watch this video by Kim Cameron to see OpenID phished.
  • We have put certain measures in place to counteract phishing attempts which are listed below.

Self Issued InfoCards

In August 2007 we announced beta support for self issued InfoCards with Windows Live ID (instead of username/password). The Windows Live ID team is working closely with the Windows CardSpace team to ensure we deliver the best solution for the 400 million+ people who use Windows Live ID monthly. Angus’s commentor, davidacoder, also asked for the Windows Live ID service to become a Managed InfoCard provider – we have been evaluating this; however we have nothing to announce yet.

Authenticating to Windows Live ID with CardSpace.

Additional Protection through Extended Validation Certificates

To further reduce the risk of phishing, we have implemented Extended Validation certificates to prove that the login.live.com site is trustworthy. I do however think more education for internet users is required to help drive the understanding of what it means when the address bar turns green (and what to do when it doesn’t). When authenticating in a web browser, Microsoft will only ask for your Windows Live ID credential pair on login.live.com – nowhere else! (See this related post).

login.live.com with the Extended Validation certificate. 

Neel continues by showing a number of other initiatives the group has taken - including the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant and “roaming tiles”.  He concludes:

We’re constantly looking for ways to balance end-user security/privacy and user experience. If the barrier to entry is too high or the user experience is poor, the users will revolt. If it is too insecure the system becomes an easy target. A balance needs to be struck Using Windows CardSpace is definitely a move forward from usernames & passwords but adoption will be the critical factor here.

And he’s right.  Sites like Windows Live can really help drive this, but they can’t tell users what to do.  The important thing is to give people the option of using Information Cards to prevent phishing.  Beyond that, it is a matter of user education. One option would be for systems like Live ID to automatically suggest stronger authentication to people who use features like data sharing and off-portal authentication - features that put password credentials more at risk.

Upcoming Internet Identity Workshop

Identity Woman Kaliya will be back to orchestrate the next identity unconference, one in a series that have played a key role in the evolution of OpenID and Information Cards.  If you are interested in identity, it's a great place to meet a lot of people involved in the community.   

Check out the conference page at Internet Identity Workshop.  Here's an overview:

The heart of the workshop is a practical idealism in working towards the shared vision of a decentralized, user-centric identity layer for the Internet.

Because the web was built around “pages”, no tools or standards were created to control how the information about you was collected or used. At the Internet Identity Workshop we bring the people creating these tools and standards so people can safely manage their online identity and control their personal data.

It is not about any one technology – rather it is a place to discuss multiple interoperating ?(and possible competing) ? projects, standards, and networks for identity, data sharing, and reputation.

As part of Identity Commons, the Internet Identity Workshop creates opportunities for both innovators and competitors. We provide an open forum for both the big guys and the small fry to come together in a safe and balanced space.

There are a wide range of projects in the community:

  1. Open conceptual, community, and governance models.
  2. Open standards and protocols.
  3. Open source projects.
  4. Commercial projects.
  5. Projects to address social and legal implications of these technologies.
  6. Efforts to rethink the business models and opportunities available with these new technologies.

User-centric identity is the ability:

  • To use one's identifier(s) on more then one site
  • To control who sees what information about you
  • To selectively share presence and profile information
  • To maintain multiple identities and personas in the contexts you wish
  • To aggregate attention, navigation, and purchase history from the sites and communities you frequent
  • To move and share your personal data, relationships, documents, and other publications as you wish

All of the following are active topic areas at each IIW:

  • Improving Existing Legal Constructs
    • Privacy Policies
    • Terms of Service
  • Creating New Legal Constructs
    • Limited Liability Personas
    • Identity Rights Agreements
  • Creating New Business Models
    • Identity Oracle
    • I-Brokers
  • New Citizenship Perspectives
    • Activism
    • Community Event Coordination
    • Community Identity and Data Sharing

The conference takes place in Mountain View, California on May 12 – 14