Lost in translation

It was pretty exciting to start posting again and once more feel like part of the twitoblogosphere, or digital reality, or whatever we’re calling it.  I have to admit to not a small amount of regret for having neglected my blog for so long – in spite of my long list of “excellent reasons” for having done so. I was therefore prepared for a nudge or two from my friends, like Mary Branscombe’s:

Yet it was wonderful to see the interest from the people I don’t know yet, like Naohiro Fujie from Japan…

… until I actually went to see what he had said, and, since it was in Japanese, pressed Facebook’s “Translation” button:

Whew!  That’s a real punishment for neglecting a blog!  Or, perhaps worse, a bit extreme as a reaction to seeing me pick up the pen again.

But given Naohiro was just a click away I thought I really had to check in and see what was up:

Boy!  It sure shows it’s better to check your understanding of what people are saying before drawing any conclusions!

Meanwhile, I give Facebook’s Japanese translation engine a double *fail*.  Please, Facebook!  Take off that Translate button!  And nice to meet you Naohiro.

A look inside AzureAD B2C

Alex Simons asked me to write a piece for his Azure Active Directory Team Blog on our policy-based architecture and the “Identity Experience Engine” we developed to handle AzureAD’s B2C scenarios.  You can read what amounts to my first public description of our new technology at “A look inside AzureAD B2C with Kim Cameron” – reprinted here for convenience:

Last month Stuart Kwan wrote a great intro to our new Azure Active Directory B2C service and showed people how to start using it. As he explained, “Once you have a B2C tenant, you register applications and configure policies which drive the behavior of sign in, sign up, and other user experiences. Policies are the secret sauce of Azure AD B2C.” He gave step-by-step instructions and showed examples like this one of using the B2C Admin Portal to configure a policy based on social network providers: Today I’d like to build on Stuart’s introduction by explaining why we saw a customizable, policy-based approach to B2C as being essential – and what it means for the rest of our identity architecture. This will help you understand how our B2C Basic offering, now in public preview, actually works. It will also provide insight into the capabilities of our upcoming B2C Premium offering, currently in private preview with Marquee customers. I think it will become evident that the combination of our Basic and Premium products will represent a substantial step forward for the industry. It means organizations of any size can handle all their different customer relationships, grow without limitation, gain exceptional control of user experience and still dramatically reduce risk, cost, and complexity.

The Why

Readers of this blog probably already know quite a bit about enterprise identity management. So let me begin with what I think is the most important piece of information I can convey to people who are already expert: B2C does not just involve a couple of tweaks on the identity management we have learned to do for employees and devices. The underlying technical infrastructure, the developer model, the protocols and information storage concepts, continue to apply. But whole new technical capabilities are also required that make B2C, well… different.

To fully understand what’s at play we need to ask, “What are the differences between the way businesses interact digitally with their customers and the way they interact with their employees?” This isn’t the place to explore this – I’ll do so on identityblog. For now I’ll sketch the big picture as I see it.

Organizations and their employees typically have a close and ongoing relationship. Employers “know” their employees, having verified their qualifications and made them part of an enterprise team. They assign them a “corporate identity” – an account and password (and potentially a smartcard or OTP device) through which they identify themselves to corporate systems. To maximize productivity, employees typically log in once and work using their corporate identity for long periods of time. Internal identity systems have not generally been context-aware: the context has simply been that the employee is at work, doing his or her job.

Meanwhile organizations have had a completely different approach towards their customers. Relationships with customers have been driven by sales and marketing departments, not by traditional IT departments. The goal has been to eliminate friction (and clicks!) so new customers come on board – even before the enterprise knows the slightest thing about them – and then deepen the relationship and get to know the customer based on his or her specific needs and behaviors. Succeeding at this results in retention of the customer over time. Marketers in a number of industries actually see the ultimate role of customer identity being to learn how to delight their customer.

Clearly there are also cases where customers need access to their own valuable possessions and information, for example, in financial, health, insurance and government scenarios. Here customers will be willing to jump through various hoops to prove their entitlement and protect what is theirs. But far from being an exception, such high value scenarios drive home the fact that interacting with customers is all about being able to match the customer experience and related identity interaction to the specific activity a customer is engaged in rather than imposing some inflexible one-size-fits-all approach on everything.

The essential is that B2C scenarios demand, above all else, the ability to customize the customer’s identity experience to what is right for whatever they are doing.

The what

The requirement for continuous customization led us to create a technology enabling organizations to create “policies” that allow complete control over identity behaviors and experiences, and use these to drive the behavior of a flexible “identity experience engine” that handles all the issues around security, information protection, protocols, support for mobile and web devices and applications, and scalability.

Any application developer, department, enterprise, or group of enterprises can create policies. Then applications and portals can, depending on their context, invoke the identity experience engine passing the name of a policy and get precisely the behavior and information exchange they want without any muss, fuss or risk. These policies are what Stuart Kwan called “the secret sauce of Azure AD B2C”.

What behaviors of the identity experience engine do the policies control?

  • The set of html and css pages that are scrubbed for security compliance (e.g. cross-site scripting vulnerability) and then presented to users
  • User journeys – the visual experiences through which the customer progresses in a given policy
  • Identity providers (for example the social networks, ISVs, and enterprise or national IdPs that can be used to establish identity)
  • Relying parties who can use the policy
  • Authentication requirements, including multifactor orchestration
  • Integration with claims verifiers (hosted within an enterprise or provided by external partners)
  • Shared schema and mappings to participants (different systems name things differently)
  • Claims transformations and data minimization (hashing and/or transformation of attributes revealing PII into non-identifying demographic attributes)
  • Blinding and encryption
  • Claims storage
  • Web Service calls and workflow initiation
  • Protocol Conversion (SAML, OAuth2, and OpenIdConnect)

The idea of user journeys is key to the customization of customer experience and sheds light on how the system works at the protocol level. The identity experience engine operates as a pipeline and uses request/response claims exchanges to communicate with its internal components as well as with external entities.

The diagram below shows the example of a browser application or mobile application redirecting to the identity experience engine while specifying a policy that invokes a user journey. This particular journey begins with an identity selection experience – completely customized by the policy to blend into the rest of the application or portal. The customer then chooses whether to log in with an email-based “application-specific account” or with a social network. Because the journey is intended to control access to a high value resource, the customer’s phone numbers are retrieved from the customer directory and she is asked to up-level her authentication using an SMS or phone call. Then a token is issued for the application providing a number of claims retrieved from the store. Of course the policy author could have created any other journey appropriate for a given use case. There is no requirement to use MFA, consult a store, use social providers or anything else: all is flexible and extensible.

The How

It is important to understand that the identity experience engine used in B2C is an intrinsic part of Azure Active Directory, not some new service. The policy-based approach applies to many AAD scenarios besides B2C. All enterprise computing can benefit from policy-based identity and you likely already recognize that AAD Premium’s Conditional Access introduces these capabilities into B2E scenarios.

It is our goal to make AAD B2C identity management available to every organization regardless of size or complexity. We’ve been working with a host of companies in preview to make sure our B2C Basic offering solves the customer identity challenges of a wide cross section of companies solving straightforward issues.

B2C Basic uses all the same technology as will B2C Premium. The difference is that the Basic policies are 100% written by our B2C Basic Admin Portal. As Stuart explained, to author policy, you pick all the options you need to integrate a growing number of social providers and/or a customizable identity provider uniquely for your tenant. You can extend schema and select multi-factor authentication, do email verification and much more. You choose what information is released to which application. As you maneuver through the portal it writes your policy.

B2C Premium will be a superset of B2C Basic in which you will be able to take advantage of all the other capabilities of the system that are not present in the Basic portal. Premium is not yet in public preview. But I invite you to follow a set of posts I will be beginning soon on identityblog to tell you all about it and show examples of how it works.

I hope to hear from you there. Meanwhile, please take a good look at B2C Basic in light of the whole world of capabilities AAD B2C Premium is opening up.

Azure Active Directory B2C is now in public preview

For the last several years I’ve been working on a new technology and capability that we are calling “Azure Active Directory B2C.”   I’m delighted that I’m finally able to tell you about it, and share the ideas behind it.

For me it is the next step in the journey to give individual consumers, enterprises and governments the identity systems they need in this period of continuously more digital interaction and increasing threats to our security and privacy.

I don’t normally put official Microsoft content on these pages, but given how important the B2C initiative is, how closely I’ve been involved, and how well it has been received, I think it makes sense to show you Microsoft’s announcement about “B2C Basic”.  It appeared on the Azure Active Directory Blog.  Stuart Kwan does a great job of introducing you to the product.

I hope you’ll take a look at his introduction.  I’ll be posting a number of pieces which expand on it – exploring issues we faced, giving you the background on the thinking behind the architecture and implementation, and telling you about the “B2C Premium” offering that is coming soon. I think the combination of Basic’s accessibility and Premium’s feature completeness really offers a new paradigm and amazing opportunities for everyone.

Introducing Microsoft Azure Active Directory B2C

By Stuart Kwan

With Azure Active Directory B2C we’re extending Azure AD to address consumer identity management for YOUR applications:

  • Essential identity management for web, PC, and mobile apps: Support sign in to your application using popular social networks like Facebook or Google, or create accounts with usernames and passwords specifically for your application. Self-service password management and profile management are provided out of the box. Phone-based multi-factor authentication enables an extra measure of protection.
  • Highly customizable and under your control: Sign up and sign in experiences are in the critical path of the most important activities in your applications. B2C gives you a high degree of control over the look and feel of these experiences, while at the same time reducing the attack surface area of your application – you never have to handle a user’s password. Microsoft is completely under the covers and not visible to your end users. Your user data belongs to you, not Microsoft, and is under your control.
  • Proven scalability and availability: Whether you have hundreds of users or hundreds of millions of users, B2C is designed to handle your load, anywhere in the world. Azure AD is deployed in more than two dozen datacenters, and services hundreds of millions of users with billions of authentications per day. Our engineers monitor the service 24/7.
  • Unique user protection features: Microsoft invests deeply in protection technology for our users. We have teams of domain experts that track the threat landscape. We’re constantly monitoring sign up and sign in activity to identify attacks and adapt our protection mechanisms. With B2C we’ll apply these anomaly, anti-fraud, and account compromise detection systems to your users.
  • Pay as you go: Azure Active Directory is a global service benefiting from tremendous economies of scale, allowing us to pass these savings along to you. We offer the B2C service on a consumption basis – you only pay for the resources that you use. Developers can take advantage of the free tier of the service when building their application.

B2C uses the same familiar programming model of Azure Active Directory. You can quickly and easily connect your application to B2C using industry standards OAuth 2.0 and OpenID Connect for authentication, and OData v3 for user management via our Graph API. Web app, web API, mobile and PC app scenarios are fully supported. The same open source libraries that are used with Azure Active Directory can be used with B2C to accelerate development.

If you want, you can get started right now! The rest of this post takes a look at how B2C works in detail.

How it works

The best way to describe B2C is to see it in action. Let’s look at an example. Our heroes, Proseware, have a consumer-facing web site. The site uses B2C for identity management. In this case that means sign in, and user self-service sign up, profile management, and password reset. Here’s the Proseware homepage:

A new user would click sign up to create a new account. They have the choice of creating an account using Google, Facebook, or by creating a Proseware account:

One quick note. The Microsoft button doesn’t work yet, but it will soon. It isn’t available at the start of the preview as we have more work to do in our converged programming model before we enable this.

What’s a Proseware account? As it turns out, there are many people out there who don’t always want to use a social account to sign in. You probably have your own personal decision tree for when you use your Facebook, Google, Microsoft or other social account to sign in, or when you create an account specifically for a site or app. In B2C a Proseware account is what we call a local account. It’s an account that gets created in the B2C tenant using an email address or a flat string as a username, and a password that is stored in the tenant. It’s local because it only works with apps registered in your B2C tenant. It can’t be used to sign in to Office 365, for example.

If a person decides to sign up with a social account, B2C uses information from the social account to pre-fill the user object that will be created in the B2C tenant, and asks the user for any other attributes configured by the developer:

Here we can see the user is also asked to enter a Membership Number and Offering Type. These are custom attributes the Proseware developer has added to the schema of the B2C tenant.

If a person decides to sign up with a Proseware account, B2C gathers the attributes configured by the developer plus information needed to create a local account. In this case the developer has configured local accounts using email as username, so the person signing up is also asked to verify their email address:

B2C takes care of verifying the person signing up has control of that email address before allowing them to proceed. Voila, the user is signed up and signed in to Proseware!

You might ask yourself, how much code did I need to write to make this elaborate sign up screen? Actually, almost none. The sign up page is being rendered by Azure AD B2C, not by the Proseware application. I didn’t have to write any code at all for the logic on that page. I only had to write the HTML and CSS so the page rendered with a Proseware look and feel. The logic for verifying the user’s email address and everything else on the page is B2C code. All I had to do was send an OpenID Connect request to B2C requesting the user sign up flow. I’ll go into more detail on this later when I talk about how I wrote the app and configured the B2C tenant.

Let’s look at a return visit. The user returns and clicks sign-in:

If the user clicks one of the social network providers, B2C will direct the person to the provider to sign in. Upon their return B2C also picks up attributes stored in the directory and returns them to the app, signing the user in.

If the user clicks the Proseware account button, they’ll see the local account sign in page, enter their name and password, and sign in:

That’s it! Now I’ll show you how I built this example.

Configuring Azure AD B2C

Step one was to get an Azure AD B2C tenant. You can do this by going to the Azure AD section of the Azure management portal and creating a B2C tenant (for a shortcut, see the B2C getting started page). B2C tenants are a little different from regular Azure AD tenants. For example, in a regular tenant, by default users can see each other in the address book. That’s what you’d expect in a company or school – people can look each other up. In a B2C tenant, by default users cannot see each other in the address book. That’s what you’d expect – your consumer users shouldn’t be able to browse each other!

Once you have a B2C tenant, you register applications in the tenant and configure policies which drive the behavior of sign in, sign up, and other user experiences. Policies are the secret sauce of Azure AD B2C. To configure these policies, you jump through a link to the new Azure management portal:

This is also the place where you find controls for setting up applications, social network providers, and custom attributes. I’m going to focus on sign up policy for this example. Here’s the list of sign up policies in the tenant. You can create more than one, each driving different behavior:

For the Proseware example I created the B2C_1_StandardSignUp policy. This policy allows a user to sign up using Facebook, Google, or email-named local accounts:

In sign up attributes I indicated what attributes should be gathered from the user during sign up. The list includes custom attributes I created earlier, Membership Number and Offering Type:

When a user completes sign up they are automatically signed in to the application. Using Application Claims I select what attributes I want to send to the application from the directory at that moment:

I’m not using multifactor authentication in this example, but if I did it’s just a simple on/off switch. During sign up the user would be prompted to enter their phone number and we would verify it in that moment.

Finally, I configured user experience customizations. You might have noticed that the sign up and sign-in experiences have a Proseware look and feel, and there isn’t much if any visual evidence of Microsoft or Azure AD. We know that for you to build compelling consumer-facing experiences you have to have as much control as possible over look and feel, so B2C is very customizable even in this initial preview. We do this by enabling you to specify HTML and CSS for the pages rendered by B2C. Here’s what the sign up page would look like with the default look and feel:

But if I configure a B2C with a URL to a web page I created with Proseware-specific look and feel:

Then the sign up experience looks like this:

You can probably imagine a number of different approaches for this kind of customization. We’re partial to this approach, as opposed to say an API-based approach, because it means our servers are responsible for correct handling of things like passwords, and our protection systems can gather the maximum signal from the client for anomaly detection. In an API-based approach, your app would need to gather and handle passwords, and some amount of valuable signal would be lost.

One quick side note. In the initial preview it is possible to do HTML/CSS customization of all the pages except the local account sign in page. That page currently supports Azure AD tenant-branding style customization. We’ll be adding the HTML/CSS customization of the sign in page before GA. Also, we currently block the use of JavaScript for customization, but we expect to enable this later.

That’s a quick look at how I set up a sign up policy. Configuring other policies like sign in and profile management is very similar. As I mentioned earlier, you can create as many policies as you want, so you can trigger different behaviors even within the same app. How to do that? By requesting a specific policy at runtime! Let’s look at the code.

Building an app that uses B2C

The programming model for Azure AD B2C is super simple. Every request you send to B2C is an OAuth 2.0 or OpenID Connect request with one additional parameter, the policy parameter “p=”. This instructs B2C which policy you want to apply to the request. When someone clicks the sign up button on the Proseware web app, the app sends this OpenID Connect sign-in request:

GET /prosewareb2c.onmicrosoft.com/oauth2/v2.0/authorize?
nonce= WzRMD9LC95HeHvDz&

The policy parameter in this example invokes the sign up policy called b2c_1_standardsignup. The OpenID Connect response contains an id_token as usual, carrying the claims I configured in the policy:

POST https://proseware.skwantoso.com/auth/openid/return HTTP/1.1


Decoding the id_token from the response yields:

typ: “JWT”,
alg: “RS256″,
kid: “IdTokenSigningKeyContainer”
exp: 1442127696,
nbf: 1442124096,
ver: “1.0”,
iss: “https://login.microsoftonline.com/d7c377db-f609-41f3-be09-2b73defd48a0/v2.0/”,
acr: “b2c_1_standardsignup”,
sub: “Not supported currently. Use oid claim.”,
aud: “9bdade37-a70b-4eee-ae7a-b38e2c8a1416″,
nonce: “WzRMD9LC95HeHvDz”,
iat: 1442124096,
auth_time: 1442124096,
oid: “2c75d1d5-59af-479b-a9c3-d841ff298216″,
emails: [
idp: “localAccountAuthentication”,
name: “Stuart Kwan”,
extension_MembershipNumber: “1234”,
extension_OfferingType: “1”

Here you can see the usual claims returned by Azure Active Directory and also a few more. The custom attributes I added to the directory and requested of the user during sign up are returned in the token as extension_MembershipNumber and extension_OfferingType. You can also see the name of the policy that generated this token in the acr claim. By the way, we are in the process of taking feedback on claim type names and aligning ourselves better with the standard claim types in the OpenID Connect 1.0 specification. You should expect things to change here during the preview.

Since Azure AD B2C is in fact, Azure AD, it has the same programming model as Azure AD. Which means full support for web app, web API, mobile and PC app scenarios. Data in the directory is managed with the REST Graph API, so you can create, read, update, and delete objects the same way you can in a regular tenant. And this is super important – you can pick and choose what features and policies you want to use. If you want to build the user sign up process entirely yourself and manage users via the Graph API, you can absolutely do so.

B2C conforms to Azure AD’s next generation app model, the v2 app model. To build your application you can make protocol calls directly, or you can use the latest Azure Active Directory libraries that support v2. To find out more visit the B2C section of the Azure AD developer guide – we’ve got quickstart samples, libraries, and reference documentation waiting for you. Just for fun, I built the Proseware example using Node.js on an Ubuntu Linux virtual machine running on Microsoft Azure (shout out to @brandwe for helping me with the code!).

How much will it cost?

B2C will be charged on a consumption basis. You pay only for the resources you use. There will be three meters, billed monthly:

  1. Number of user accounts in the directory
  2. Number of authentications
  3. Number of multi-factor authentications

An authentication is defined as any time an application requests a token for a resource and successfully receives that token (we won’t charge for unsuccessful requests). When you consider the OAuth 2.0 protocol, this counts as when a user signs in with a local account or social account, and also when an application uses a refresh token to get a new access token.

You can find the B2C pricing tiers on the Azure.com pricing page. There will be a free tier for developers who are experimenting with the service. The current B2C preview is free of charge and preview tenants are capped at 50,000 users. We can raise that cap for you on a case by case basis if you contact us. We’ll lift the cap when billing is turned on. Do you have hundreds of millions of users? No problem. Bring ‘em on!

What’s next

We’ve already worked with many developers to build apps using Azure AD B2C as part of a private preview program. Along the way we’ve gathered a healthy backlog of features:

  1. Full UX customization: Not just the aforementioned HTML/CSS customization of the local account sign in page, but also the ability to have your URL appear in the browser for every page rendered by B2C. That will remove the last visible remnant of Microsoft from the UX.
  2. Localization: Of course you have users all over the world speaking many languages. Sign in, sign up, and other pages need to render appropriately using strings you provide in the languages you want to support.
  3. Token lifetime control: The ability to control the lifetimes of Access Tokens, ID Tokens and Refresh Tokens is important both for user experience and for you to tune your consumption rate.
  4. A hook at the end of sign up: A number of people have said they want the ability to check a user who is signing up against a record in a different system. A little hook at the end of sign up would allow them to do this, so we’re considering it.
  5. Support for more social networks.
  6. Support for custom identity providers: This would be the ability to, say, add an arbitrary SAML or OpenID Connect identity provider to the tenant.
  7. A variety of predefined reports: So that you can review the activity in your tenant at a glance and without having to write code to call an audit log API.
  8. And more, this is just a fraction of the list…

You can track our progress by following the What’s New topic in the B2C section of the Azure AD developer guide, which you can find in the documentation pages and also by following this blog.

By the way, the proper name of this preview is the Azure Active Directory B2C Basic preview. We’re planning a Premium offering as well, with features that take policies to the next level. But that’s for another blog post!

Please write us

We’re eager to hear your feedback! We monitor stackoverflow (tag: azure-active-directory) for development questions. If you have a feature suggestion, please post it in the Azure Active Directory User Voice site and put “AADB2C:” in the title of your suggestion.

Stuart Kwan (Twitter: @stuartkwan)
Principal Program Manager
Azure Active Directory


Yes to SCIM. Yes to Graph.

Today Alex Simons, Director of Program Management for Active Directory, posted the links to the Developer Preview of Windows Azure Active Directory.  Another milestone.

I'll write about the release in my next post.  Today, since the Developer Preview focuses a lot of attention on our Graph API, I thought it would be a good idea to respond first to the discussion that has been taking place on Twitter about the relationship between the Graph API and SCIM (Simple Cloud Identity Management).

Since the River of Tweets flows without beginning or end, I'll share some of the conversation for those who had other things to do:

@NishantK: @travisspencer IMO, @johnshew’s posts talk about SaaS connecting to WAAD using Graph API (read, not prov) @IdentityMonk @JohnFontana

@travisspencer: @NishantK Check out @vibronet’s TechEd Europe talk on @ch9. It really sounded like provisioning /cc @johnshew @IdentityMonk @JohnFontana

@travisspencer: @NishantK But if it’s SaaS reading and/or writing, then I agree, it’s not provisioning /cc @johnshew @IdentityMonk @JohnFontana

@travisspencer: @NishantK But even read/write access by SaaS *could* be done w/ SCIM if it did everything MS needs /cc @johnshew @IdentityMonk @JohnFontana

@NishantK: @travisspencer That part I agree with. I previously asked about conflict/overlap of Graph API with SCIM @johnshew @IdentityMonk @JohnFontana

@IdentityMonk: @travisspencer @NishantK @johnshew @JohnFontana check slide 33 of SIA322 it is really creating new users

@IdentityMonk: @NishantK @travisspencer @johnshew @JohnFontana it is JSON vs XML over HTTP… as often, MS is doing the same as standards with its own

@travisspencer: @IdentityMonk They had to ship, so it’s NP. Now, bring those ideas & reqs to IETF & let’s get 1 std for all @NishantK @johnshew @JohnFontana

@NishantK: @IdentityMonk But isn’t that slide talking about creating users in WAAD (not prov to SF or Webex)? @travisspencer @johnshew @JohnFontana

@IdentityMonk: @NishantK @travisspencer @johnshew @JohnFontana indeed. But its like they re one step of 2nd phase. What are your partners position on that?

@IdentityMonk: @travisspencer @NishantK @johnshew @JohnFontana I hope SCIM will not face a #LetTheWookieWin situation

@NishantK: @johnshew @IdentityMonk @travisspencer @JohnFontana Not assuming anything about WAAD. Wondering about overlap between SCIM & Open Graph API

Given these concerns, let me explain what I see as the relationship between SCIM and the Graph API.

What is SCIM?

All the SCIM documents begin with a commendably unambiguous statement of what it is:

The Simple Cloud Identity Management (SCIM) specification is designed to make managing user identity in cloud based applications and services easier. The specification suite seeks to build upon experience with existing schemas and deployments, placing specific emphasis on simplicity of development and integration, while applying existing authentication, authorization and privacy models. Its intent is to reduce the cost and complexity of user management operations by providing a common user schema and extension model, as well as binding documents to provide patterns of exchanging this schema using standard protocols. In essence, make it fast, cheap and easy to move users in to, out of and around the cloud. [Kim: emphasis is mine]

I support this goal. Further, I like the concept of spec writers being crisp about the essence of what they are doing: “Make it fast, cheap and easy to move users in to, out of and around the cloud”.  For this type of spec to be useful we need it to be as widely adopted as possible, and that means keeping it constrained, focussed and simple enough that everyone chooses to implement it.

I think the SCIM authors have done important work to date.  I have no comments on the specifics of the protocol or schema at this point – I assume those will continue to be worked out in accordance with the spec's “essence statement” and be vetted by a broad group of players now that SCIM is on a track towards standardization.  Microsoft will try to help move this forward:  Tony Nadalin will be attending the next SCIM meeting in Vancouver on our behalf.

Meanwhile, what is “the Graph”? 

Given that SCIM's role is clear, let's turn to the question of how it relates to a “Graph API”.  

Why does our thinking focus on a Graph API in addition to a provisioning protocol like SCIM?  There are two answers.

Let's start with the theoretical one.  It is  because of the central importance of graph technology in being able to manage connectedness – something that is at the core of the digital universe.  Treating the world as a graph allows us to have a unified approach to querying and manipulating interconnected objects of many different kinds that exist in many different relationships to each other.

But theory only appeals to some… So let's add a second answer that is more… practical.  A directory has emerged that by August is projected to contain one billion users. True, it's only one directory in a world with many directories (most agree too many).  But beyond the importance it achieves through its scale, it fundamentally changes what it means to be a directory:  it is a directory that surfaces a multi-dimensional network.  

This network isn't simply a network of devices or people.  It's a network of people and the actions they perform, the things they use and create, the things that are important to them and the places they go.  It's a network of relationships between many meaningful things.  And the challenge is now for all directories, in all domains, to meet a new bar it has set.    

Readers who come out of a computer science background are no doubt familiar with what a graph is.  But I recommend taking the time to come up to speed on the current work on connectedness, much of which is summarized in Networks, Crowds and Markets: Reasoning About a Highly Connected World (by Easley and Kleinberg).  The thesis is straightforward:  the world of technology is one where everything is connected with everything else in a great many dimensions, and by refocusing on the graph in all its diversity we can begin to grasp it. 

In early directories we had objects that represented “organizations”, “people”, “groups” and so on.  We saw organizations as “containing” people, and saw groups as “containing” people and other groups in a hierarchical and recursive fashion.  The hierarchy was a particularly rigid kind of network or graph that modeled the rigid social structures (governments, companies) being described by technology at the time.

But in today's flatter, more interconnected world, the things we called “objects” in the days of X.500 and LDAP are better expressed as “nodes” with different kinds of “edges” leading to many possible kinds of other “nodes”.  Those who know my work from around 2000 may remember I used to call this polyarchy and contrast it with the hierarchical limitations of LDAP directory technology.

From a graph perspective we can see “person nodes” having “membership edges” to “group nodes”.  Or “person nodes” having “friend edges” to other “person nodes”.  Or “person nodes” having “service edges” to a “mail service node”.  In other words the edges are typed relationships between nodes that may possibly contain other properties.  Starting from a given node we can “navigate the graph” across different relationships (I think of them as dimensions), and reason in many new ways. 

For example, we can reason about the strength of the relationships between nodes, and perform analysis, understand why things cluster together in different dimensions, and so on.

From this vantage point, directory is a repository of nodes that serve as points of entry into a vast graph, some of which are present in the same repository, and others of which can only be reached by following edges that point to resources in different repositories.  We already have forerunners of this in today's directories – for example, if the URL of my blog is contained in my directory entry it represents an edge leading to another object.  But with conventional technology, there is a veil over that distant part of the graph (my blog).  We can read it in a browser but not access the entities it contains as structured objects.  The graph paradigm invites us to take off the veil, making it possible to navigate nodes across many dimensions.

The real power of directory in this kind of interconnected world is its ability to serve as the launch pad for getting from one node to a myriad of others by virtue of different  relationships. 

This requires a Graph Protocol

To achieve this we need a simple, RESTful protocol that allows use of these launch pads to enter a multitude of different dimensions

We already know we can build a graph with just HTTP REST operations.  After all, the web started as a graph of pages…  The pages contained URLs (edges) to other pages.  It is a pretty simple graph but that's what made it so powerful.

With JSON (or XML) the web can return objects.  And those objects can also contain URLs.  So with just JSON and HTTP you can have a graph of things.  The things can be of different kinds.  It's all very simple and very profound.

No technology ghetto

Here I'm going to put a stake in the ground.  When I was back at ZOOMIT we built the first commercial implementation of LDAP while Tim Howes was still at University of Michigan.  It was a dramatic simplification relative to X.500 (a huge and complicated standard that ZOOMIT had also implemented) and we were all very excited at how much Tim had simplified things.  Yet in retrospect, I think the origins of LDAP in X.500 condemned directory people to life in a technology ghetto.  Much more dramatic simplifications were coming down the pike all around us in the form of HTML, latter day SQL and XML.  For every 100 application programmers familiar with these technologies, there might have been – on a good day – one who knew something about LDAP.  I absolutely respect and am proud of all the GOOD that came from LDAP, but I am also convinced that our “technology isolation” was an important factor that kept (and keeps) directory from being used to its potential.

So one of the things that I personally want to see as we reimagine directory is that every application programmer will know how to program to it.  We know this is possible because of the popularity of the Facebook Graph API.  If you haven't seen it close up and you have enough patience to watch a stream of consciousness demo you will get the idea by watching this little walkthrough of the Facebook Graph Explorer.   Or better still just go here and try with your own account data.

You have to agree it is dead simple and yet does a lot of what is necessary to navigate the kind of graph we are talking about.  There are many other similar explorers available out there – including ours.  I chose Facebook's simply because it shows that this approach is already being used at colossal scale.  For this reason it reveals the power of the graph as an easily understood model that will work across pretty much any entity domain – i.e. a model that is not technologically isolated from programming in general.

A pluggable namespace with any kind of entity plugging in

In fact, the Graph API approach taken by Facebook follows a series of discussions by people now scattered across the industry where the key concept was one of creating a uniform pluggable namespace with “any” kind of entity plugging in (ideas came from many sources including the design of the Azure Service Bus).

Nishant and others have posed the question as to whether such a multidimensional protocol could do what SCIM does.  And my intuition is that if it really is multidimensional it should be able to provide the necessary functionality.  Yet I don't think that diminishes in any way the importance of or the need for SCIM as a specialized protocol.  Paradoxically it is the very importance of the multidimensional approach that explains this.

Let's have a thought experiment. 

Let's begin with the assumption that a multidimensional protocol is one of the great requirements of our time.  It then seems inevitable to me that we will continue to see the emergence of a number of different proposals for what it should be.  Human nature and the angels of competition dictate that different players in the cloud will align themselves with different proposals.  Ultimately we will see convergence – but that will take a while.   Question:  How are we do cloud provisioning in the meantime?  Does everyone have to implement every multidimensional protocol proposal?  Fail!

So pragmatism calls for us to have a widely accepted and extremely focused way of doing provisioning that “makes it fast, cheap and easy to move users in to, out of and around the cloud”.

Meanwhile, allow developers to combine identity information with information about machines, services, web sites, databases, file systems, and line of business applications through multidimensional protocols and APIs like the Facebook and the Windows Azure Active Directory Graph APIs.  For those who are interested, you can begin exploring our Graph API here:  Windows Azure AD Graph Explorer (hosted in Windows Azure) (Select ‘Use Demo Company’ unless you have your own Azure directory and have gone through the steps to give the explorer permission to see it…)

To me, the goals of SCIM and the goals of the Graph API are entirely complementary and the protocols should coexist peacefully.  We can even try to find synergy and ways to make things like schema elements align so as to make it as easy as possible to move between one and the other. 

Diagram 2.0: No hub. No center.

As I wrote here, Mary Jo Foley's interpretation of one of the diagrams in John Shewchuk's second WAAD post made it clear we needed to get a lot visually crisper about what we were trying to show.  So I promised that we'd go back to the drawing board.  John put our next version out on twitter, got more feedback (see comments below) and ended up with what Mary Jo christened “Diagram 2.0″.  Seriously, getting feedback from so many people who bring such different experiences to bear on something like this is amazing.  I know the result is infinitely clearer than what we started with.

In the last frame of the diagram, any of the directories represented by the blue symbol could be an on-premise AD, a Windows Azure AD, something hybrid, an OpenLDAP directory, an Oracle directory or anything else.  Our view is that having your directory operated in the cloud simplifies a lot.  And we want WAAD to be the best possible cloud directory service, operating directories that are completely under the control of their data owners:  enterprises, organizations, government departments and startups.

Further comments welcome.

Good news and bad news from Delaware Lawmakers

Reading the following SFGate story was a real rollercoaster ride: 

DOVER, Del. (AP) — State lawmakers have given final approval to a bill prohibiting universities and colleges in Delaware from requiring that students or applicants for enrollment provide their social networking login information.

The bill, which unanimously passed the Senate shortly after midnight Saturday, also prohibits schools and universities from requesting that a student or applicant log onto a social networking site so that school officials can access the site profile or account.

The bill includes exemptions for investigations by police agencies or a school's public safety department if criminal activity is suspected.

Lawmakers approved the bill after deleting an amendment that expanded the scope of its privacy protections to elementary and secondary school students.

First of all there was the realization that if lawmakers had to draft this law it meant universities and colleges were already strong-arming students into giving up their social networking credentials.  This descent into hell knocked my breath away. 

But I groped my way back from the burning sulfur since the new bill seemed to show a modicum of common sense. 

Until finally we learn that younger children won't be afforded the same protections…   Can teachers and principals actually bully youngsters to log in to Facebook and access their accounts?  Can they make kids hand over their passwords?  What are we teaching our young people about their identity?

Why oh why oh why oh? 


There is no hub. There is no center.

Mary Jo Foley knows her stuff, knows identity and knows Microsoft.  She just published a piece called “With Azure Active Directory, Microsoft wants to be the meta ID hub“.  The fact that she picked up on John Shewchuk's piece despite all the glamorous announcements made in the same timeframe testifies to the fact that she understands a lot about the cloud.  On the other hand, I hope she won't mind if I push back on part of her thesis.  But before I do that, let's hear it:

Summary: A soon-to-be-delivered preview of a Windows Azure Active Directory update will include integration with Google and Facebook identity providers.

Microsoft isn’t just reimaginging Windows and reimaginging tablets. It’s also reimaginging Active Directory in the form of the recently (officially) unveiled Windows Azure Active Directory (WAAD).

In a June 19 blog post that largely got lost among the Microsoft Surface shuffle last week, Microsoft Technical Fellow John Shewchuk delivered the promised Part 2 of Microsoft’s overall vision for WAAD.

WAAD is the cloud complement to Microsoft’s Active Directory directory service. Here’s more about Microsoft’s thinking about WAAD, based on the first of Shewchuk’s posts. It already is being used by Office 365, Windows InTune and Windows Azure. Microsoft’s goal is to convince non-Microsoft businesses and product teams to use WAAD, too.

This is how the identity-management world looks today, in the WAAD team’s view:

And this is the ideal and brave new world they want to see, going forward.

WAAD is the center of the universe in this scenario (something with which some of Microsoft’s competitors unsurprisingly have problem).

[Read more of the article here]

The diagrams Mary Jo uses are from John's post.  And the second clearly shows the “Active Directory Service”  triangle in the center of the picture so one can understand why Mary Jo (and others) could think we are talking about Active Directory being at the center of the universe. 

Yet in describing what we are building, John writes,

“Having a shared directory that enables this integration provides many benefits to developers, administrators, and users.”

“Shared” is not the same as “Central”.  For the Windows Azure AD team the “shared directory” is not “THE hub” or “THE center”.  There is no one center any more in our multi-centered world.  We are not building a monolithic, world-wide directory.  We are instead consciously operating a directory service that contains hundreds of thousands of directories that are actually owned by individual enterprises, startups and government organizations.  These directories are each under the control of their data owner, and are completely independent until their data owner decides to share something with someone else.

The difference may sound subtle, but I don't think it is.  When I think of a hub I think of a standalone entity mediating between a set of claims providers and a set of relying parties.  

But with Azure Active Directory the goal is quite different:  to offer a holistic “Identity Management as a Service” for organizations, whether startups, established enterprises or government organizations – in other words to “operate” on behalf of these organizations.  

One of the things such a service can do is to take care of connecting an organization to all the consumer and corporate claims providers that may be of use to it.  We've actually built that capability, and we'll operate it on a 24/7 basis as something that scales and is robust.  But IdMaaS involves a LOT of other different capabilities as well.  Some organizations will want to use it for authentication, for authorization, for registration, credential management and so on.  The big IdMaaS picture is one of serving the organizations that employ it – quite different from being an independent hub and following a “hub” business model. 

In this era of the cloud, there are many cloud operators.  Martin Kuppinger has pointed out that “the cloud” is too often vendor-speak for “this vendor's cloud”.  In reality there are “clouds” that will each host services that are premium grade and that other services constructed in different clouds will want to consume.  So we will all need the ability to reach accross clouds with complete agility, security and privacy and within a single governance framework.  That's what Identity Management as a Service needs to facilitate, and the Active Directory Service triangle in the diagram above is precisely such a service.  There will be others operated by competitors handling the identity needs of other organizations.  Each of us will need to connect enterprises we serve with those served by our competitors. 

This said, I really accept the point that to express this in a diagram we could (and should)  draw it very differently.  So that's something John and I are going to work on over the next few days.  Then we'll get back to you with a diagram that better expresses our intentions.


Disruptive Forces: The Economy and the Cloud

New generations of digital infrastructure get deployed quickly even when they are incompatible with what already exists.  But old infrastructure is incredibly slow to disappear.   The complicated business and legal mechanisms embodied in computer systems are risky and expensive to replace..  But existing systems can't function without the infrastructure that was in place when they were built…  Thus new generations of infrastructure can be easily added, but old and even antique infrastructures survive alongside them to power the applications that have not yet been updated to employ new technologies.

This persistence of infrastructure can be seen as a force likely to slow changes in Identity Management, since it is a key component of digital infrastructure.

Yet global economic and technological trends lead in the opposite direction. The current reality is one of economic contraction where enterprises and governments are under increasing pressure to produce more with less. Analysts and corporate planners don’t see this contraction as being transient or likely to rebound quickly. They see it as a long-term trend in which organizations become leaner, better focused and more fit-to-purpose – competing in an economy where only fit-to-purpose entities survive.

At the same time that these economic imperatives are shaking the enterprise and governments, the introduction of cloud computing enables many of the very efficiencies that are called for.

Cloud computing combines a number of innovations. Some represent new ways of delivering and operating computing and communications power.  But the innovations go far beyond higher density of silicon or new efficiencies in cooling technologies…  The cloud is ushering in a whole new division of labor within information technology.

Accelerating the specialization of functions

The transformational power of the cloud stems above all else from its ability to accelerate the specialization of functions so they are provided by those with the greatest expertise and lowest costs.

I was making this “theoretical” point while addressing the TSCP conference recently, which brings together people from extremely distributed industries such as aeronautics and defense.  Looking out into the audience I was suddenly struck by something that should have been totally obvious to me.  All the industries represented in that room, except for information technology, had an extensive division of labor across a huge number of parties.  Companies like Boeing or Airbus don't manufacture the spokes on the wheels of their planes, so to speak.  They develop specifications and assemble completed products in cost effective ways that are manufactured and refined by a whole ecosystem.  They have massively distributed supply chains.  Yet our model in information technology has remained rather pre-industrial and there are innumerable examples of companies expending their own resources doing things they aren't expert at, rather than employing a supply chain.  And part of the reason is because of the lack of an infrastructure that supports this diversification.  That infrastructure is just arriving now – in the form of the cloud.   

Redistributing processes to be most efficiently performed

So  technologically the cloud is an infrastructure honed for multi-sourcing – refactoring processes and redistributing them to be most efficiently performed.

The need to become leaner and more fit-to-purpose will drive continuous change.  Organizations will attempt to take advantage of the emerging cloud ecology to substitute off-the-shelf commoditized systems offered as specialized services. When this is not possible they will construct their newly emerging systems in the cloud using other specialized ecosystem services as building blocks.

Given the fact that the best building blocks for given purposes may well be hosted on different clouds, developers will expect to be able to reach across clouds to integrate with the services of their choice. Cloud platforms that don’t offer this capability will die from synergy deficiency.

Technological innovation will need to take place before services will be able to work securely in this kind of loosely coupled world – constituting a high-value version of what has been called the “API Economy”. The precept of the API economy is to expose all functionality as simple and easily understood services (e.g. based on REST) – and allow them to be consumed at a high level of granularity on a pay-as-you-go basis.

In the organizational world, most of the data that will flow through these APIs will be private data. For enterprises and governments to participate in the API Economy they will require a system of access control in which many different applications run by different administrations in different clouds are able to reuse knowledge of identity and security policy to adequately protect the data they handle.  They will also need shared governance.

Specifically, it must be possible to reliably identify, authenticate, authorize and audit across a graph of services before reuse of specialized services becomes practicable and economical and the motor of cloud economics begins to hum.


Making Good on the Promise of IdMaaS

The second part of John Shewchuk's blog on Windows Azure Active Directory has been published here.  John goes into more detail about a number of things, focusing on the way it allows customers to hook their Cloud AD into the API Economy in a controlled and secure way.  

Rather than describe John's blog myself I'm going to parrot the blog post that analyst Craig Burton put up just a few hours ago.  I find it really encouraging to see his excitement:  it's the way I feel too, since I also think this is going to open up so many opportunities for innovation, make developing services simpler and make the services themselves more secure and respectful of privacy.  Here's Craig's post:

As a follow up to Microsoft’s announcement of IdMaaS, the company announced the — to be soon delivered — developer preview for Windows Azure Active Directory (WAzAD). As John Shewchuk puts it:

The developer preview, which will be available soon, builds on capabilities that Windows Azure Active Directory is already providing to customers. These include support for integration with consumer-oriented Internet identity providers such as Google and Facebook, and the ability to support Active Directory in deployments that span the cloud and enterprise through synchronization technology.

Together, the existing and new capabilities mean a developer can easily create applications that offer an experience that is connected with other directory-integrated applications. Users get SSO across third-party and Microsoft applications, and information such as organizational contacts, groups, and roles is shared across the applications. From an administrative perspective, Windows Azure Active Directory provides a foundation to manage the life cycle of identities and policy across applications.

In the Windows Azure Active Directory developer preview, we added a new way for applications to easily connect to the directory through the use of REST/HTTP interfaces.

An authorized application can operate on information in Windows Azure Active Directory through a URL such as:


Such a URL provides direct access to objects in the directory. For example, an HTTP GET to this URL will provide the following JSON response (abbreviated for readability):

{ “d”: {
“Manager”: { “uri”:”https://directory.windows.net/contoso.com/Users(‘User…’)/Manager” },
“MemberOf”: { “uri”:”https://directory.windows.net/contoso.com/Users(‘User…’)/MemberOf” },
“ObjectId”: “90ef7131-9d01-4177-b5c6-fa2eb873ef19″,
“ObjectReference”: “User_90ef7131-9d01-4177-b5c6-fa2eb873ef19″,
“ObjectType”: “User”,
“AccountEnabled”: true,
“DisplayName”: “Ed Blanton”,
“GivenName”: “Ed”,
“Surname”: “Blanton”,
“UserPrincipalName”: Ed@contoso.com,
“Mail”: Ed@contoso.com,
“JobTitle”: “Vice President”,
“Department”: “Operations”,
“TelephoneNumber”: “4258828080”,
“Mobile”: “2069417891”,
“StreetAddress”: “One Main Street”,
“PhysicalDeliveryOfficeName”: “Building 2″,
“City”: “Redmond”,
“State”: “WA”,
“Country”: “US”,
“PostalCode”: “98007” }

Having a shared directory that enables this integration provides many benefits to developers, administrators, and users. If an application integrates with a shared directory just once—for one corporate customer, for example—in most respects no additional work needs to be done to have that integration apply to other organizations that use Windows Azure Active Directory. For an independent software vendor (ISV), this is a big change from the situation where each time a new customer acquires an application a custom integration needs to be done with the customer’s directory. With the addition of Facebook, Google, and the Microsoft account services, that one integration potentially brings a billion or more identities into the mix. The increase in the scope of applicability is profound. (Highlighting is mine – Craig).

Now that’s What I’m Talking About

There is still a lot to consider in what an IdMaaS system should actually do, but my position is that just the little bit of code reference shown here is a huge leap for usability and simplicity for all of us. I am very encouraged. This would be a major indicator that Microsoft is on the right leadership track to not only providing a specification for an industry design for IdMaaS, but also is on well on its way to delivering a product that will show us all how this is supposed to work.


The article goes on to make commitments on support for OAuth, Open ID Connect, and SAML/P. No mention of JSON Path support but I will get back to you about that. My guess is that if Microsoft is supporting JSON, JSON Path is also going to be supported. Otherwise it just wouldn’t make sense.

JSON and JSON Path

The API Economy is being fueled by the huge trend of accessibility of organization’s core competence through APIs. Almost all of the API development occurring in this trend are based of a RESTful API design with data being encoded in JSON (JavaScript Object Notation). While JSON is not a new specification by any means, it is only in the last 5 years that JSON has emerged as the preferred — in lieu of XML — data format. We see this trend only becoming stronger.

[Craig presents a table comparing XPath to XML – look at it here.]


As an industry, we are completely underwater in getting our arms around a workable — distributed and multi-centered identity management metasystem — that can even come close to addressing the issues that are already upon us. This includes the Consumerization of IT and its subsequent Identity explosion. Let alone the rise of the API Economy. No other vendor has come close to articulating a vision that can get us out of the predicament we are already in. There is no turning back.

Because of the lack leadership (the crew that killed off Information Cards) in the past at Microsoft about its future in Identity Management, I had completely written Microsoft off as being relevant. I would have never expected Microsoft to gain its footing, do an about face, and head in the right direction. Clearly the new leadership has a vision that is ambitious and in alignment with what is needed. Shifting with this much spot on thinking in the time frame we are talking about (a little over 18 months) is tantamount to turning an aircraft carrier 180 degrees in a swimming pool.

I am stunned, pleased and can’t wait to see what happens next.

I think it goes without saying that “turning an aircraft carrier 180 degrees in a swimming pool” is a fractal mixed metaphor of colossal and recursive proportions that boggles the mind – yet there is more than a little truth to it.  In fact that's really one of the things the cloud demands of us all.

Craig's question about JSON Path is a good one.  The answer is that JSON Path is essentially a way of navigating and extracting information from a JSON document.  WAzAD's Graph API returns JSON documents and if they are complex documents we expect programmers will use JSON Path – which they already know – to extract specific information.  It will be part of their local programming environment on whatever device or platform they are issuing a query from.

On the other hand, one can imagine supporting JSON Path queries in the RESTful interface itself.  Suppose you have a JSON document with many links to other JSON documents.  Do you then support “chaining” on the server so it follows the links for you and returns the distributed JSON Path result?  The problem with this approach is that a programming model we want to be ultra-simple and transparent for the programmer turns into something opaque that can have many side effects, become unpredictable and exhibit performance issues.  As far as I know, the social network APIs that are most sophisticated in their use of links don't support this.  They just get the programmer to chase the links that are of interest.

So for these reasons server support is something we have talked about but don't yet have a position on.  This is exactly the kind of thing we'd like to explore by collaborating with developers and getting their input.  I'd also like to hear what other people have experienced in this regard.


Viviane Reding's Speech to the Digital Enlightenment Forum

It was a remarkable day at the annual conference of the Digital Enlightenment Forum  in Luxembourg.  The Forum is an organization that has been set up over the last year to animate a dialog about how we evolve a technology that embodies our human values.  It describes its vision this way: 

The DIGITAL ENLIGHTENMENT FORUM aims to shed light on today’s rapid technological changes and their impact on society and its governance. The FORUM stimulates debate and provides guidance. By doing so, it takes reference from the Enlightenment period as well as from transformations and evolutions that have taken place since. It examines digital technologies and their application openly with essential societal values in mind. Such values might need to be given novel forms taking advantage of both today’s knowledge and unprecedented access to information.

For the FORUM, Europe’s Age of Enlightenment in the 18th century serves as a metaphor for our current times. The Enlightenment took hold after a scientific and technological revolution that included the invention of book printing, which generated a novel information and communication infrastructure. The elite cultural Enlightenment movement sought to mobilise the power of reason, in order to reform society and advance knowledge. It promoted science and intellectual interchange and opposed superstition, intolerance and abuses by the church and state. (more)

 The conference was intended to address four main themes:

  • What can be an effective organisation of governance of ICT infrastructure, including clouds? What is the role of private companies in relation to the political governance in the control and management of infrastructure? How will citizens be empowered in the handling of their personal data and hence in the management of their public and private lives?
  • How do we see the relation between technology and jurisdiction? Can we envisage a techno-legal ecosystem that ensures compliance with law (’coded law’), and how can sufficient political control be ensured in a democratic society?
  • What are the consequences for privacy, freedom and creativity of the massive data collection on behaviour, location, etc. by private and public organisations and their use through mining and inferencing for profiling and targeted advertising?
  • What needs to be done to ensure open discussion and proper political decision-making to find an appropriate balance between convenience of technology use and social acceptability?
  • The day was packed with discussions that went beyond the usual easy over-simplifications.  I won't try to describe it here but will post the link to the webcast when it becomes available.

    One of the highlights was a speech by Mme Viviane Reding, the Vice President of the European Union (who also serves as commissioner responsible for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship) about her new proposed Data Protection legislation.   Speaking later to the press she emphasized that the principle of private data belonging to the individual has applied in the European Union since 1995, and that her new proposals are simply a continuation along three lines.  First, she wants users to understand their rights and get them enforced;  second she is trying to provide clarity for companies and reduce uncertainty about how the data protection laws will be applied;  and third, she wants to make everyone understand that there will be sanctions.  She said,

    “If you don't have sanctions, who cares about the rules?  Who cares about the law?”

    And the sanctions are major:  2% of world-wide turnover of the company.  Further they apply to all companies, anywhere in the world, that collect information from Europeans.

    I very much recommend that everyone involved with identity and data protection read her speech, “Outdoing Huxley: Forging a high level of data protection for Europe in the brave new digital world”.

    In my view, the sanctions Mme Reding proposes will, from the point of view of computer science, be meted out as corrections for breaking the Laws of Identity.  John Fontana asked me about this very dynamic in an article he did recently on the relevance of the Laws of Identity seven years after they were written (2005).

    ZDNet: The Laws of Identity predicted that government intervention in identity and privacy would increase, why is that happening now?

    Cameron: There are many entities that routinely break various of these identity laws; they use universal identifiers, they collect information and use it for different purposes than were intended, they give it to parties that don’t have rights to it, they do it without user control and consent. You can say that makes the Laws irrelevant. But what I predicted is that if you break those Laws there will be counter forces to correct for that. And I believe when we look at recent developments – government and policy initiatives that go in the direction of regulation – that is what is happening. Those developments are providing the counter force necessary to bring behavior in accordance with the laws. The amount of regulation will depend on how quickly entities (Google, Facebook, etc.) respond to the pressure.

    ZDNet: Do we need regulation?

    Cameron: It’s not that I am calling for regulation. I am saying it is something people bring upon themselves really. And they bring it on themselves when they break the Laws of Identity.